(K)Training

15th July(SUN)

Kazuya Maeda  

K-1

Title

The common point of companies that can't leave the available lessons learned (From the view of the educational company and the manager)

15th July(SUN) 13:15~14:15

Director, TRADE CREATE co.,ltd.
Kazuya Maeda


Note

This is a session in Japanese.


PDU 【JF18S001】

 TechnicalLeadershipStrategicTotal PDU
PMP®0.50.501
PgMP®0.50.501
PMI-RMP®00.500.5
PMI-SP®00.500.5
PMI-ACP®00.500.5
PfMP®00.500.5
PMI-PBA®00.500.5

 

Academic Committee, Japan Chapter Gary M Nelson

See profile

 Academic Committee, Japan Chapter Ko Ito

[ English ]

 

K-2

Title

Never too young to be a project manager

15th July(SUN) 14:30~15:30
Academic Committee, Japan Chapter
 

PMI NZ Chapter
     Gary M Nelson
Director, PMI Japan Chapter
     Ko Ito


Overview

Managing projects is tough. You need training, experience, an iron will and a cast-iron stomach to handle the challenges and complexities that your sponsor, stakeholders, vendors and customers throw at you. Sometimes it may seem that if you aren’t some sort of Superman, you won't survive. However, many would disagree. Around the world, children can - and do - manage projects every day. The difference between their projects and yours is scale and language. But even at that, you may find yourself surprised at what mere children can do in the world of projects. When it comes right down to it, Project Management is not a profession, but a set of essential life skills that can be applied at nearly any age. Abstract thinking develops at around the age of ten, and that is an ideal time to start developing fundamental skills that will help them in their everyday lives - at home, in school, and in their future profession, whether or not they become a project manager. However, some key skills can be learned at an even younger age. They might use those skills to build a fantastic tree house… or hydroelectric power plant in the future. Can children plan? Certainly. Can they form teams and communicate? Of course. Can a ten year old do a basic risk assessment and develop a set of deliverables, dependencies and estimate tasks? Can an eleven year old determine the critical path of a project using a network diagram? Yes, they can do all of that too. Just don’t be too critical of their spelling, and they may use simpler language and have fun while they do it. Learning to manage projects is an essential life skill - and you are never too young (or too old) to learn how to do it. 


PDU 【JF18A001】

 TechnicalLeadershipStrategicTotal PDU
PMP®0.250.7501
PgMP®0.250.7501
PMI-RMP®00.7500.75
PMI-SP®00.7500.75
PMI-ACP®00.7500.75
PfMP®00.7500.75
PMI-PBA®00.7500.75

 

Education Study Group, Japan Chapter Masahiro Inoue Education Study Group, Japan Chapter Hiroya Kato  

K-3

Title

Learn by Teaching

15th July(SUN) 15:45~16:45
Education Study Group, Japan Chapter
Ayako Togaeri
Hiroya Kato


Note

This is a session in Japanese.


PDU 【JF18C031】

 TechnicalLeadershipStrategicTotal PDU
PMP®0.250.250.51
PgMP®0.250.250.51
PMI-RMP®00.250.50.75
PMI-SP®00.250.50.75
PMI-ACP®00.250.50.75
PfMP®00.250.50.75
PMI-PBA®00.250.50.75

 

Human Resources Development Study Group, Japan Chapter Nobuyuki Katagawa Human Resources Development Study Group, Japan Chapter Tomomi Suzuki  

K-4

Title

What makes a project manager who can motivate various stakeholders

15th July(SUN) 17:00~18:00
Human Resources Development Study Group, Japan Chapter
Nobuyuki Katagawa
Tomomi Suzuki


Note

This is a session in Japanese.


PDU 【JF18C036】

 TechnicalLeadershipStrategicTotal PDU
PMP®0101
PgMP®0101
PMI-RMP®0101
PMI-SP®0101
PMI-ACP®0101
PfMP®0101
PMI-PBA®0101